Breast Cancer Experiences

S*it People Say: Unsolicited Advice When You Have Cancer

https://rethinkbreastcancer.com/how-to-respond-to-unsolicited-advice/

We’ve all been there, on the receiving end of advice we didn’t ask for. But when you’re a young woman with breast cancer, these unwelcome (often alternative health-related) opinions and “tips” have a different impact. Even when given with the best intentions (maybe even from loved ones), unsolicited advice often makes the assumption that people with breast cancer are responsible or at fault for their diagnosis and progress. This is NOT true. 

So, what’s the best way to handle it besides a blank stare? We asked our young women’s network – women who have been on the receiving end of these comments – how they respond to unsolicited advice.

Here’s what they had to say…

Alina S. 

Rethink Young Women’s Network (RYWN) is an online community for young women with breast cancer to connect with each other and share their journeys. No pink ribbons required. 

Find out how you or someone you know can get involved HERE!

Laura R.

Rethink Young Women’s Network (RYWN) is an online community for young women with breast cancer to connect with each other and share their journeys. No pink ribbons required. 

Find out how you or someone you know can get involved HERE!

 

Nicole R. 

Rethink Young Women’s Network (RYWN) is an online community for young women with breast cancer to connect with each other… Read More

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

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How To Respond to Unsolicited Advice

https://rethinkbreastcancer.com/how-to-respond-to-unsolicited-advice/

We’ve all been there, on the receiving end of advice we didn’t ask for. But when you’re a young woman with breast cancer, these unwelcome (often alternative health-related) opinions and “tips” have a different impact. Even when given with the best intentions (maybe even from loved ones), unsolicited advice often makes the assumption that people with breast cancer are responsible or at fault for their diagnosis and progress. This is NOT true. 

So, what’s the best way to handle it besides a blank stare? We asked our young women’s network – women who have been on the receiving end of these comments – how they respond to unsolicited advice.

Here’s what they had to say…

Alina S. 


Rethink Young Women’s Network (RYWN) is an online community for young women with breast cancer to connect with each other and share their journeys. No pink ribbons required. 

Find out how you or someone you know can get involved HERE!

Laura R.


Rethink Young Women’s Network (RYWN) is an online community for young women with breast cancer to connect with each other and share their journeys. No pink ribbons required. 

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Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More

How To Respond to Unsolicited Advice

https://rethinkbreastcancer.com/how-to-respond-to-unsolicited-advice/

We’ve all been there, on the receiving end of advice we didn’t ask for. But when you’re a young woman with breast cancer, these unwelcome (often alternative health-related) opinions and “tips” have a different impact. Even when given with the best intentions (maybe even from loved ones), unsolicited advice often makes the assumption that people with breast cancer are responsible or at fault for their diagnosis and progress. This is NOT true. 

So, what’s the best way to handle it besides a blank stare? We asked our young women’s network – women who have been on the receiving end of these comments – how they respond to unsolicited advice.

Here’s what they had to say…

Alina S. 

Rethink Young Women’s Network (RYWN) is an online community for young women with breast cancer to connect with each other and share their journeys. No pink ribbons required. 

Find out how you or someone you know can get involved HERE!

Laura R.

Rethink Young Women’s Network (RYWN) is an online community for young women with breast cancer to connect with each other and share their journeys. No pink ribbons required. 

Find out how you or someone you know can get involved HERE!

 

Nicole R. 

Rethink Young Women’s Network (RYWN) is an online community for young women with breast cancer to connect with each other… Read More

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More

Do Hormonal Contraceptives Increase Breast Cancer Risk?

http://www.breastcancer.org/research-news/do-hormonal-contraceptives-increase-risk

According to a Danish study, contraceptives that use hormones, including birth control pills and intrauterine devices (IUDs), slightly increase the risk of breast cancer. But the importance of the increase is unique to each woman and depends on many factors, including:

  • her age
  • her general health
  • her personal risk of breast cancer
  • other breast cancer risk factors, such as smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol, and maintaining a healthy weight

The study was published on Dec. 7, 2017 by the New England Journal of Medicine. Read the abstract of “Contemporary Hormonal Contraception and the Risk of Breast Cancer.”

The need for safe, effective birth control is shared by many women around the world. About 140 million women worldwide use hormonal contraception. Besides effectively stopping unwanted pregnancies, birth control pills also help control other conditions, such as acne, PMS, heavy periods, and mood swings. Research also has shown that birth control pills can slightly lower the risk of uterine and ovarian cancer. There is also some evidence that birth control pills may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.

Still, research suggested that older forms of hormonal birth control that contained higher doses of hormones were linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. Newer forms of contraceptives that contained lower doses of hormones were considered safer, though all contained warnings in the instructions that they could increase cancer risk. The Danish study reviewed here wanted to quantify that risk.

It’s extremely important to know that if you have been diagnosed with breast cancer, you SHOULD NOT use contraceptives that use hormones. There is evidence that hormonal contraceptives may increase the risk of the cancer coming back (recurrence).

To do the study, the researchers looked at the medical recor…

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

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