Breast Cancer Experiences

UPDATE: Canadian Breast Cancer Stats 2016

https://rethinkbreastcancer.com/update-canadian-breast-cancer-stats-2016/

In 2015, we made a post on the Canadian Cancer Society’s predictive stats for breast cancer. Now that it’s 2017, we thought you might want the DL on the latest stats regarding breast cancer in Canada. So, here’s an update!

In 2016, the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation (now joined with the Canadian Cancer Society) posted their most recent predictive statistics for breast cancer in Canada. Overall, what they estimate is that there haven’t been many changes in overall breast cancer incidence and mortality rates in Canada. Minor increases of incidence were seen in some age groups (including the under 40 range). However, this is mostly accounting for population growth, rather than an increase in overall breast cancer rates. And the estimation of 4,900 breast cancer deaths (in Canadian women) was the same as the estimated deaths in 2014.

Is this good? Well, yes, it’s good to know that we aren’t seeing higher rates of breast cancer in women. But is it bad too? Well, you always want to see improvements. We’ve seemed to hit a stalemate for breast cancer survival in Canada – with the 5-year survival rate remaining steadily at 87% since 2011.

Breast Cancer is steadily the top cancer type found in women in Canada. In 2016, it was estimated that 25,700 women (130.1 per 100,000) would be diagnosed. However, the rates of breast cancer in young women is exceptionally low. While 17% of breast cancers were expected to be diagnosed in women under 50, most of these (13%) were in women between the ages of 40 and 49.

This means that only 4-5% of diagnoses were predicted to occur in women under the age of 40. 

The overall breast cancer mortality rate in Canada is the lowest it has been since 1950. After its peak in 1986, the mortality rate has fallen 44%. This is likely due to improved overall cancer control, including  increased mammography screening and the use of more effective therapies followi… Read More

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UPDATE: Canadian Breast Cancer Stats 2016

https://rethinkbreastcancer.com/update-canadian-breast-cancer-stats-2016/

In 2015, we made a post on the Canadian Cancer Society’s predictive stats for breast cancer. Now that it’s 2017, we thought you might want the DL on the latest stats regarding breast cancer in Canada. So, here’s an update!


In 2016, the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation (now joined with the Canadian Cancer Society) posted their most recent predictive statistics for breast cancer in Canada. Overall, what they estimate is that there haven’t been many changes in overall breast cancer incidence and mortality rates in Canada. Minor increases of incidence were seen in some age groups (including the under 40 range). However, this is mostly accounting for population growth, rather than an increase in overall breast cancer rates. And the estimation of 4,900 breast cancer deaths (in Canadian women) was the same as the estimated deaths in 2014.

Is this good? Well, yes, it’s good to know that we aren’t seeing higher rates of breast cancer in women. But is it bad too? Well, you always want to see improvements. We’ve seemed to hit a stalemate for breast cancer survival in Canada – with the 5-year survival rate remaining steadily at 87% since 2011.

Breast Cancer is steadily the top cancer type found in women in Canada. In 2016, it was estimated that 25,700 women (130.1 per 100,000) would be diagnosed. However, the rates of breast cancer in young women is exceptionally low. While 17% of breast cancers were expected to be diagnosed in women under 50, most of these (13%) were in women between the ages of 40 and 49.

This means that only 4-5% of diagnoses were predicted to occur in women under the age of 4…

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Experimental Abemaciclib Improves Survival in Metastatic, Hormone-Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

http://www.breastcancer.org/research-news/abemaciclib-promising-for-hr-pos-her2-neg-mets

A study has found that the experimental targeted therapy medicine abemaciclib in combination with the hormonal therapy Faslodex (chemical name: fulvestrant) offered better progression-free survival than Faslodex alone in women diagnosed with metastatic, hormone-receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer.

Progression-free survival is how long the women lived without the breast cancer growing.

The research was presented on June 3, 2017 at the 2017 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting and published online on the same day by the Journal of Clinical Oncology:

George Sledge, M.D., professor of oncology at Stanford University and member of the Breastcancer.org Professional Advisory Board, is the lead author of the study and presented the results at the ASCO annual meeting.

Like Ibrance (chemical name: palbociclib) and Kisqali (chemical name: ribociclib), abemaciclib is a cyclin-dependent 4/6 kinase inhibitor. A kinase is a type of protein in the body that helps control cell division. Abemaciclib works by stopping cancer cells from dividing and growing. Abemaciclib is a pill taken by mouth.

Metastatic breast cancer is breast cancer that has spread to a part of the body away from the breast, such as the bones or liver.

Hormonal therapy is used to treat hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer. Faslodex is an estrogen recep…

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Another Biosimilar Seems as Effective as Herceptin

http://www.breastcancer.org/research-news/another-biosimilar-as-effective-as-herceptin

Herceptin (chemical name: trastuzumab) is a monoclonal antibody, a targeted therapy medicine used to treat HER2-positive breast cancers. Herceptin is what’s called a “biologic” drug. This means that it is made from living organisms, in this case a protein from a mouse cell. A monoclonal antibody is a type of protein made in the lab that can bind to substances in the body, including cancer cells. Each monoclonal antibody is made so that it binds only to one substance. Herceptin binds to the HER2 receptor proteins in cancer cells.

Because they are made from living organisms, biologic drugs are much more complex to make than conventional drugs that are made from a mixture of chemicals. The chemical structure of conventional drugs can be easily identified and duplicated, which is why there are so many generic drugs on the market.

A biosimilar is a new type of biologic drug. A biosimilar is almost identical to a biologic drug that is already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (or similar organizations in other countries). It can help to think of a biosimilar as a generic version of a biologic drug, though that comparison isn’t completely accurate.

The makers of biosimilars don’t have access to the original cell lines used to make the biologic drug. They also don’t have access to the exact purification process or other manufacturing steps used by the makers of the biologic drug.

Biologic drugs can be very sensitive to changes in the manufacturing process. If one small step is done differently, the biosimilar may have very different effects than the original biologic drug.

So the FDA requires that any biosimilar drug go through the same rigorous clinical trials that original biologic drugs do before the agency will approve the biosimilar.

A study suggests that a drug that is a biosimilar to Herceptin, called CT-P6, is as effective and as safe as Herceptin.

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