Frank J. DellaCroce, M.D., F.A.C.S.

https://www.breastcancer.org/about_us/pab/frank-dellacroce

Frank dellacroce

Frank J. DellaCroce, MD, FACS is a founding partner of the Center for Restorative Breast Surgery and St. Charles Surgical Hospital, the first hospital in the world dedicated to breast reconstruction for women affected by breast cancer. Board certified in Plastic Surgery, “Dr. D” has performed thousands of reconstructive procedures for women battling breast cancer and those who look to prevent it with risk reduction surgery.

He received his medical degree from the Louisiana State University Health Science Center. He then went on to complete his surgical training in Houston at the University of Texas Health Science Center and M.D. Anderson Hospital before returning to LSU to complete a fellowship in plastic surgery. He is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and is a member of numerous societies, including the American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the American Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery, and the World Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery.

Dr. D is an honorary board member of the Susan G. Komen Foundation and serves on the advisory board for the FORCE and I’m Taking Charge organizations. The American Cancer Society has named him a Spirit Award Honoree for going above and beyond in the fight against cancer and he has been named one of the “Best Doctors in America” for the last 5 consecutive years. He is a widely published author and has lectured extensively throughout the United States, Europe, Latin America, and Asia on the ground-breaking innovations pioneered at the Center. He and his partners are visionaries in the art of breast reconstruction, and they welcome women from around the world for treatment in their dedicated facility in the Big Easy.

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Understanding Breast Cancer

https://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/understand_bc

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SurgConsult

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with breast cancer, it’s important to understand some basics: What is breast cancer and how does it happen?

In this section, you can learn about how breast cancer develops, how many people get breast cancer, and what factors can increase risk for getting breast cancer. You also can learn more about signs and symptoms to watch for and how to manage any fears you may have about breast cancer.

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Alan Stolier, M.D.

https://www.breastcancer.org/about_us/pab/alan_stolier

Alan Stolier, MD, FACS has over 35 years experience in surgical oncology. He specializes in surgical treatment of breast cancer, and is a pioneer in the development of nipple-sparing mastectomy.

Board certified in surgery, Dr. Stolier brings tremendous experience and expertise to the surgical team at the Center for Restorative Breast Surgery. He received his medical degree from Louisiana State University School of Medicine. Following his surgical internship at the University of Virginia Hospital, Dr. Stolier returned to New Orleans to begin his residency in general surgery at Charity Hospital of Louisiana. He then completed fellowships in surgical oncology at MD Anderson Cancer Institute and Hammersmith Hospital in London, England. He is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and is a member of numerous societies including the American Society of Breast Disease and the American Society of Breast Surgeons. Dr. Stolier has a particular interest in breast cancer genetics and the associated care of women with the BRCA genetic mutation.

Dr. Stolier is past president of the New Orleans Surgical Society and has been a clinical professor of surgery for the Tulane University Health Sciences Center since 2005. He is a past board member of the LSU Medical Foundation and Memorial Medical Center. He has published nearly two-dozen articles pertaining to breast cancer and treatment of breast cancer in such publications as Annals of Surgical Oncology and American Journal of Surgery. He has lectured extensively throughout the United States, and the American Cancer Society named Dr. Stolier a 2010 Spirit Award Honoree for going above and beyond in the fight against breast cancer.

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Face-to-Face and Internet-Based Counseling Therapy Both Help Ease Fear and Anxiety in People With Cancer

https://www.breastcancer.org/research-news/counseling-helps-ease-fear-and-anxiety

After a cancer diagnosis, many people are angry, scared, confused, and depressed. All these feelings are a perfectly normal reaction. Still, if your feelings are getting in the way of you living your life and focusing on treatment and healing, you might want to consider seeking help from someone who has experience in helping people navigate the emotional roller coaster of cancer.

A number of small studies have shown that a specific type of counseling therapy, called mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, can help ease pain, fatigue, depression, and other psychological distress in women diagnosed with breast cancer.

Still, not everyone has the ability to see a mindfulness-based cognitive therapist in person. A small Dutch study suggests offering this type of counseling via the internet offers the same benefits as face-to-face counseling.

The research was published online on June 28, 2018 by the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Read the abstract of “Face-to-Face and Internet-Based Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Compared With Treatment as Usual in Reducing Psychological Distress in Patients With Cancer: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.”

The study included 245 people who had been diagnosed with cancer and were experiencing anxiety, depression, and/or other psychological distress related to the cancer diagnosis, based on regularly used assessment tools:

  • 210 (85.7%) of the participants were women
  • 151 (61.6%) of the participants had been diagnosed with breast cancer

The people were randomly assigned to one of three groups:

  • Face-to-face mindfulness-based cognitive behavioral therapy (77 people; 53 were diagnosed with breast cancer): This therapy was tailored to people diagnosed with cancer and included 8 weekly 2.5-hour group sessions, a 6-hour silent day, and daily assignments to be done at home tha…

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Scott K. Sullivan, M.D., F.A.C.S.

https://www.breastcancer.org/about_us/pab/scott-sullivan

Scott sullivan

Scott K. Sullivan, MD, FACS is a founding partner of the Center for Restorative Breast Surgery (CRBS) and the St. Charles Surgical Hospital, the only hospital in the world dedicated to breast reconstruction for women facing breast cancer. Dr. Sullivan is one of the most sought-after breast reconstructive microsurgeons in the world. Having performed thousands of reconstructive surgeries since the inception of the CRBS in 2003, Dr. Sullivan and his partners at the CRBS lead the way in landmark breast reconstruction techniques utilizing the body’s own tissue. Because of their expertise in the field of reconstructive microsurgery, his practice is the referring destination for the most complex reconstructive challenges.

Dr. Sullivan received his undergraduate degree in biomedical engineering from Tulane University. He is a graduate of Louisiana State University Health Science Center, where he also completed his residencies in both general surgery and plastic and reconstructive surgery. Shortly after completion he decided to dedicate his professional career to the advancement and innovation of techniques in the field of microsurgical breast reconstruction and co-founded the Center for Restorative Breast Surgery. He is on the Board of Advisors for Tulane University School of Science and Engineering, a board member of BioAesthetics Corporation, and serves as a member of the Professional Advisory Board for Breastcancer.org, where he has made editorial contributions. Dr. Sullivan is also an honorary board member of the Susan G. Komen Foundation for the Cure and a board member of You Night. He has numerous publications to his credit, with particular emphasis on the newest methods of breast reconstruction, and he has lectured on …

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EndoPredict Test

https://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/testing/types/endopredict-test

The EndoPredict Test, offered by Myriad Genetics, Inc., is a genomic test for people newly diagnosed with early-stage, estrogen-receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer.

Research suggests the EndoPredict test may be widely used to help make treatment decisions based on the cancer’s risk of coming back in a part of the body away from the breast (distant metastasis) within 10 years after diagnosis. The EndoPredict test provides a risk score that is either low-risk or high-risk of breast cancer recurring as distant metastasis.
Knowing if the cancer has a high or low risk of recurrence can help women and their doctors decide if chemotherapy or other treatments to reduce risk after surgery are needed.

What are genomic tests?

Genomic tests analyze a sample of a cancer tumor to see how active certain genes are. The activity level of these genes affects the behavior of the cancer, including how likely it is to grow and spread. Genomic tests are used to help make decisions about whether more treatments after surgery would be beneficial.

While their names sound similar, genomic testing and genetic testing are very different.

Genetic testing is done on a sample of your blood, saliva, or other tissue and can tell if you have an abnormal change (also called a mutation) in a gene that is linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. See the Genetic Testing pages for more information.

Who is eligible for the EndoPredict test?

You may be a candidate for the EndoPredict test if:

  • you’ve recently been diagnosed with stage I or II estrogen-receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer
  • there is no cancer in your lymph nodes (node-negative disease) OR you have cancer in one to three lymph nodes
  • you and your doctor are making decisions about chemotherapy

If …

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What Is Immunotherapy?

https://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/immunotherapy/what

Immunotherapy medicines use the power of your body’s immune system to attack cancer cells.

Your immune system is made up of a number of organs, tissues, and cells that work together to protect you from foreign invaders that can cause disease. When a disease- or infection-causing agent, such as a bacterium, virus, or fungus, gets into your body, your immune system reacts and works to kill the invaders. This self-defense system works to keep you from getting sick.

Cancer immunotherapy medicines work by helping your immune system work harder or more efficiently to fight cancer cells. Immunotherapy uses substances — either made naturally by your body or man-made in a lab — to boost the immune system to:

  • stop or slow cancer cell growth
  • stop cancer cells from spreading to other parts of the body
  • be better at killing cancer cells

To start an immune system response to a foreign invader, the immune system has to be able to tell the difference between cells or substances that are “self” (part of you) versus “non-self” (not part of you and possibly harmful). Your body’s cells have proteins on their surfaces or inside them that help the immune system recognize them as “self.” This is part of the reason the immune system usually doesn’t attack your body’s own tissues. (Autoimmune disorders happen when the immune system mistakenly attacks your own tissues, such as the thyroid gland, joints, connective tissue, or other organs.)

“Non-self” cells have proteins and other substances on their surfaces and inside them that the body doesn’t recognize, called antigens. Foreign antigens trigger the immune system to attack them and the cells they are in or on, whether viruses, bacteria, or infected cells. This response either destroys the foreign invaders or keeps them in check so they can’t harm the body.

So why doesn’t your immune system attack breast cancer cells on its…

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About Us

https://www.breastcancer.org/about_us

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Breastcancer.org is a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing the most reliable, complete, and up-to-date information about breast cancer.

Our mission is to help women, men, and their loved ones make sense of the complex medical and personal information about breast health and breast cancer, so they can make the best decisions for their lives.

Breastcancer.org Team
Meet the people who work hard to develop, implement, and enhance Breastcancer.org’s on- and off-line programs.
Board of Directors
Members of the Breastcancer.org Board of Directors represent diverse areas of business, philanthropy, media, and communications.
Professional Advisory Board (PAB)
All medical information on the Breastcancer.org website and in our printed materials is reviewed by members of the PAB, which includes over 70 practicing medical professionals from around the world who are leaders in their fields.
Spanish Advisory Committee
The Spanish Advisory Committee is formed by key opinion leaders connected with the Hispanic community who provide advice and guidance regarding breast cancer and breast health.
The Press Room
Learn basic facts about breast cancer and about Breastcancer.org, peruse Breastcancer.org’s media appearances, and find logo and logo-use guidelines.
Supporters
Breastcancer.org is a nonprofit organization supported by individuals, foundations, …

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