Chemotherapy Hair Loss Management Video Series

http://www.breastcancer.org/tips/hair_skin_nails/hair-loss-videos

If chemotherapy is part of your treatment plan and you’re worried about hair loss, you’re not alone. Like many women, you might feel that the hair on your head is a big part of your identity, and losing it can feel traumatic.

At the same time, there are lots of ways you can prepare and get through it. In this video series, you’ll hear from women who’ve been there and learn how they chose to deal with it.

*These videos are about loss of hair on your head. In future videos, we’ll talk about how to manage thinning or loss of eyebrows and eyelashes.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cy3hAaeG9zI&w=525&h=295]

How to Prepare for Chemotherapy Hair Loss

Watch and learn the real stories of women diagnosed with breast cancer who’ve been through chemotherapy-related hair loss. Tips include cutting hair shorter and shopping for wigs, hats, or scarves ahead of time.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NTrF9b4lEJc&w=525&h=295]

Options for Managing Chemotherapy Hair Loss

In this video, you’ll hear from women diagnosed with breast cancer who found ways to manage chemotherapy-related hair loss. Learn about cold caps and scalp cooling systems, human hair and synthetic wigs, halo wigs, hats, scarves, and taking care of your scalp.

Visit our Discussion Board community to connect with others going through chemo about hair loss, wigs, cold caps, and more.

Thank you:

  • Michell B. and Traci S. for sharing their stories
  • Christine Lafferty McGowan, hair stylist at Currie Hair, Skin & Nails in Wayne, Pennsylvania
  • Barbara Vivolo, alternative hair specialist at Barbara’s Hair Studio in Hauppauge, New York
  • FreshFly productions
  • The Breastcancer.org donors who contributed to th…

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Hair, Skin, and Nails

http://www.breastcancer.org/tips/hair_skin_nails

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Hair, Skin, Nails, and Breast Cancer

In this section, we’ll discuss everything you need to know about the very visible parts of your body that are affected by cancer treatments—your hair, skin, and nails.

You can find out all about hair loss and managing skin and nail side effects on these pages:

GOP Tax Bill Takes Aim at Affordable Care Act

http://www.lbbc.org/news-opinion/gop-tax-bill-takes-aim-affordable-care-act

Tax plan would end individual mandate, raise insurance premiums
Breast Cancer News
November 17, 2017
Author: 
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5 Tips for Working from Home

https://rethinkbreastcancer.com/5-tips-for-working-from-home/

The Best Tips for Working from Home

Working from home is the dream for many office workers, but it isn’t always what it seems. Working from that home office brings a variety of new challenges with it. Overcoming these challenges is important to maintain the new at home status. Follow these tips from people successful at working from home to make sure you never see the inside of a permanent office again.

Continue the Commute

This seems silly, but consider what happened during that morning commute. You were able to think about your day and spend some time inside your own head. Taking away this part of the day might actually be harmful. Take some time before and after work to switch from home life to work. Go for a walk and think about your tasks for the day, then go back outside at the end of the day to unwind. This transition period is essential in separating work from home and vice versa.

Get That Office

The images of people working poolside from home just aren’t realistic. You need a dedicated office area for your work. This will tell your brain that it’s time to work and allow your psyche to switch to work mode. This is part of switching from home to work; stepping into that dedicated space is symbolic of stepping into work.

Maintain Your Relationships

If you start working for days without seeing another human being, make sure you change that. You need to maintain friendships and other relationships to balance yourself. No one survives on work alone. Make sure to get out at least once a week with some friends or other social group, such as a book club or local church. This also includes work-based relationships whether it’s networking, sub-contractors, or those who hire you. By keeping in touch and building these relationships, you will gain new and diverse work opportunities.

Manage Distractions

One of the biggest surprises for first-time stay at home workers is the number of distractions. Remember that you are sti… Read More

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

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5 Tips for Working from Home

https://rethinkbreastcancer.com/5-tips-for-working-from-home/

The Best Tips for Working from Home

Working from home is the dream for many office workers, but it isn’t always what it seems. Working from that home office brings a variety of new challenges with it. Overcoming these challenges is important to maintain the new at home status. Follow these tips from people successful at working from home to make sure you never see the inside of a permanent office again.

Continue the Commute

This seems silly, but consider what happened during that morning commute. You were able to think about your day and spend some time inside your own head. Taking away this part of the day might actually be harmful. Take some time before and after work to switch from home life to work. Go for a walk and think about your tasks for the day, then go back outside at the end of the day to unwind. This transition period is essential in separating work from home and vice versa.

Get That Office

The images of people working poolside from home just aren’t realistic. You need a dedicated office area for your work. This will tell your brain that it’s time to work and allow your psyche to switch to work mode. This is part of switching from home to work; stepping into that dedicated space is symbolic of stepping into work.

Maintain Your Relationships

If you start working for days without seeing another human being, make sure you change that. You need to maintain friendships and other relationships to balance yourself. No one survives on work alone. Make sure to get out at least once a week with some friends or other social group, such as a book club or local church. This also includes work-based relationships whether it’s networking, sub-contractors, or those who hire you. By keeping in touch and building these relations…

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Cymbalta Eases Joint Pain From Aromatase Inhibitors

http://www.breastcancer.org/research-news/cymbalta-eases-joint-pain-from-ais

After surgery, women diagnosed with hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer usually take hormonal therapy medicine to reduce the risk of the cancer coming back (recurrence). Hormonal therapy medicines work in two ways:

  • by lowering the amount of estrogen in the body
  • by blocking the action of estrogen on breast cancer cells

There are several types of hormonal therapy medicines. Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), is one of the most well-known. Tamoxifen can be used to treat both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Another type of hormonal therapy, the aromatase inhibitors:

  • Arimidex (chemical name: anastrozole)
  • Aromasin (chemical name: exemestane)
  • Femara (chemical name: letrozole)

have been shown to be more effective at reducing recurrence risk in postmenopausal women and are used more often than tamoxifen to treat women who’ve gone through menopause. Aromatase inhibitors aren’t commonly used to reduce recurrence risk in premenopausal women.

Both tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors can cause side effects. Tamoxifen may cause hot flashes and increase the risk of blood clots and stroke. Aromatase inhibitors may cause muscle and joint aches and pains. Less common but more severe side effects of aromatase inhibitors are heart problems, osteoporosis, and broken bones. Research has shown that about 25% of women who are prescribed hormonal therapy to reduce the risk of recurrence after breast cancer surgery either don’t start taking the medicine or stop taking it early. In many cases, this is because of side effects.

If doctors can find a way to ease these side effects, more women might stick to their treatment plans.

A study has found that the antidepressant Cymbalta (chemical name: duloxetine) can ease joint pain in women diagnosed with early-stage, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer who are taking an aromatase inhibitor after …

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