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Breast Reconstruction Decisions Should Be Personalized, Informed By Most Current Data

https://www.breastcancer.org/research-news/recon-decisions-should-be-personalized-and-informed

Many, but not all, women who have mastectomy to treat breast cancer go on to have one or both breasts reconstructed. There are many ways to reconstruct a breast. Tissue from the back, belly, buttocks, or other part of the body can be used to create a new breast. Doctors call this autologous reconstruction. Saline or silicone gel implants are another option. In some cases, an implant is added after autologous reconstruction.

Breast reconstruction can be done at different times, depending on what works best for a woman’s individual situation. When breast reconstruction is done at the same time as mastectomy surgery, it’s called immediate reconstruction. As soon as the breast is removed by the breast cancer surgeons, the plastic surgeon reconstructs the breast.

Results from two studies suggest that decisions about the type of reconstruction to have need to be personalized to each woman’s unique situation and informed by the most current information on long-term outcomes, satisfaction, and complication rates.

Both studies used information from the Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium, a study designed to evaluate breast reconstruction from a patient’s point of view, compiling information on postoperative pain, psychosocial well-being, physical functioning, fatigue, and patient satisfaction.

The studies both were published online on June 20, 2018 by JAMA Surgery. Read the abstracts of:

In the first study, 1,217 women who had immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomy at 11 centers across North America between 2012 and 2015 comple…

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

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Osteonecrosis of the Jaw

https://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/side_effects/osteonecrosis

Osteonecrosis of the jaw is a rare but serious condition in which the cells in the jawbone start to die.

Osteonecrosis of the jaw can be caused by bisphosphonates, medicines used to strengthen bones:

Researchers think that osteonecrosis of the jaw may develop because bisphosphonates stop the body from repairing microscopic damage to the jawbone that can happen during routine dental procedures or from everyday wear and tear. But it’s still not clear why this happens in some people and not in others.

Because some breast cancer treatments can cause bone loss (osteoporosis), many women being treated for breast cancer also take a bisphosphonate.

Xgeva (chemical name: denosumab) can also cause osteonecrosis of the jaw. Xgeva is used to reduce bone complications and bone pain caused by advanced-stage breast cancer that has spread to the bone.

Symptoms of osteonecrosis of the jaw include:

  • pain, swelling, redness, or other signs of infection in the gums
  • gums or sockets that don’t heal after dental work
  • loose teeth
  • numbness or a heavy feeling in the jaw
  • draining
  • having bone become visible in your mouth

Managing osteonecrosis of the jaw

Osteonecrosis of the jaw is usually treated with antibiotics, oral rinses, and removable mouth appliances (retai…

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More

Breast Reconstruction Decisions Should Be Personalized, Informed By Most Current Data

http://www.breastcancer.org/research-news/recon-decisions-should-be-personalized-and-informed

Many, but not all, women who have mastectomy to treat breast cancer go on to have one or both breasts reconstructed. There are many ways to reconstruct a breast. Tissue from the back, belly, buttocks, or other part of the body can be used to create a new breast. Doctors call this autologous reconstruction. Saline or silicone gel implants are another option. In some cases, an implant is added after autologous reconstruction.

Breast reconstruction can be done at different times, depending on what works best for a woman’s individual situation. When breast reconstruction is done at the same time as mastectomy surgery, it’s called immediate reconstruction. As soon as the breast is removed by the breast cancer surgeons, the plastic surgeon reconstructs the breast.

Results from two studies suggest that decisions about the type of reconstruction to have need to be personalized to each woman’s unique situation and informed by the most current information on long-term outcomes, satisfaction, and complication rates.

Both studies used information from the Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium, a study designed to evaluate breast reconstruction from a patient’s point of view, compiling information on postoperative pain, psychosocial well-being, physical functioning, fatigue, and patient satisfaction.

The studies both were published online on June 20, 2018 by JAMA Surgery. Read the abstracts of:

In the first study, 1,217 women who had immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomy at 11 centers across North America between 2012 and 2015 comple…

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More

Osteonecrosis of the Jaw

http://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/side_effects/osteonecrosis

Osteonecrosis of the jaw is a rare but serious condition in which the cells in the jawbone start to die.

Osteonecrosis of the jaw can be caused by bisphosphonates, medicines used to strengthen bones:

Researchers think that osteonecrosis of the jaw may develop because bisphosphonates stop the body from repairing microscopic damage to the jawbone that can happen during routine dental procedures or from everyday wear and tear. But it’s still not clear why this happens in some people and not in others.

Because some breast cancer treatments can cause bone loss (osteoporosis), many women being treated for breast cancer also take a bisphosphonate.

Xgeva (chemical name: denosumab) can also cause osteonecrosis of the jaw. Xgeva is used to reduce bone complications and bone pain caused by advanced-stage breast cancer that has spread to the bone.

Symptoms of osteonecrosis of the jaw include:

  • pain, swelling, redness, or other signs of infection in the gums
  • gums or sockets that don’t heal after dental work
  • loose teeth
  • numbness or a heavy feeling in the jaw
  • draining
  • having bone become visible in your mouth

Managing osteonecrosis of the jaw

Osteonecrosis of the jaw is usually treated with antibiotics, oral rinses, and removable mouth appliances (retaine…

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More

Tips From Real Women on Living with Metastatic Breast Cancer

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/types/recur_metast/blog/tips-from-real-women

by Jen Uscher

After a diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer, it may be difficult to grapple with your fears about the future and keep moving forward. You might feel overwhelmed when you’re faced with making decisions about your treatment, managing treatment side effects, and juggling work and family responsibilities.

Many people find the insights and support of others living with metastatic breast cancer particularly useful as they try to find a new normal.

Here, members of Breastcancer.org’s community share the strategies that have helped them cope and live well with metastatic disease.

Don’t hesitate to ask for and accept help

“I would encourage anyone [with metastatic breast cancer] to learn to ask for help. As a mother of four, I have had to learn to let a little bit of control go to make my life easier. Seek help, whether it be meals prepared by others, cleaning services, childcare help, etc.”
-Leftfootforward

“I needed so much help with my young family during my treatment, but I was surrounded by many people who were willing to step in and help our family during this stressful time. Extreme challenges often bring out the best in people, and I am forever changed by the love and thoughtfulness of those who prayed for me, took care of my children, brought meals, and visited me.”
-Springlakegirl

Talk with your medical team about what they can do to help you feel better

“Side effects of drugs/treatment can be managed. Talk to your doctors. I was so sick with A/C chemotherapy and on the third cycle I finally said something. A few changes and my fourth cycle was amazing. Changes in dosage of Xeloda have helped with my hand-foot symptoms. Be honest about how you feel and see if your team can help make you feel better. Don’t be afraid to ask stupid questions. There are none. And don’t be afraid to advocate for yourself. Even if it means finding another medical provider.”<…

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

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