Posts by Sourced by BCSN-team

Talzenna

https://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/targeted_therapies/talzenna

Talzenna (chemical name: talazoparib) was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Oct. 16, 2018, to treat locally advanced or metastatic HER2-negative breast cancer with an inherited BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

Locally advanced cancer is breast cancer that has spread to tissue near the breast, but not to parts of the body away from the breast. Metastatic breast cancer is cancer that has spread to parts of the body away from the breast, such as the bones or liver.

Talzenna is a pill taken by mouth. The recommended starting dose of Talzenna is a 1-mg tablet taken once per day, with or without food.

Learn more about:

How Talzenna works

Most inherited cases of breast cancer are associated with two gene mutations: BRCA1 (BReast CAncer gene one) and BRCA2 (BReast CAncer gene two). Women with a mutated BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene have up to an 85% risk of developing breast cancer by age 70. Their risk of ovarian cancer also is higher than average. Men with a BRCA gene mutation have a higher risk of both breast and prostate cancer.

DNA carries genetic information in both healthy cells and cancer cells. Cells can develop DNA damage spontaneously or from exposure to specific things in the environment (too much sun, for example) that make DNA damage more likely to happen. But cells can detect and repair damage to DNA. When DNA is damaged in a healthy cell and the damage isn’t fixed, that cell can become cancerous. The function of the BRCA genes is to keep breast cells growing normally and prevent any cancer growth. But if there is a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 …

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More

Drugs for Treatment and Risk Reduction

https://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/druglist

<!–
Start of DoubleClick Floodlight Tag: Please do not remove
Activity name of this tag: English Treatment – F/W2012
URL of the webpage where the tag is expected to be placed: http://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/
This tag must be placed between the and tags, as close as possible to the opening tag.
Creation Date: 08/28/2012
–>

Breastcancer.org has created this guide to help you quickly get information about the many medicines used to treat or lower the risk of breast cancer. Not included are pain medications or medicines used to treat side effects of breast cancer medicines.

Each listing includes:

  • brand name
  • chemical name
  • how the medicine works
  • uses, including whether it’s given before surgery (neoadjuvant) or after surgery (adjuvant)
  • form (pill, IV, injection)
  • side effects

Abraxane (chemical name: albumin-bound or nab-paclitaxel)

Adriamycin (chemical name: doxorubicin)

Afinitor (chemical name: everolimus)

Aranesp (chemical name: darbepoetin alfa)

Aredia (chemical name: pamidronate)

Arimidex (chemical name: anastrozole)

Aromasin (chemical name: exemestane)

<a title="Avastin" href="https://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/druglist/avastin"…

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More

Talzenna

https://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/druglist/talzenna

Brand name: Talzenna

Chemical name: Talazoparib

Class: PARP inhibitor. Lynparza is another PARP inhibitor

How it works: The poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) enzyme fixes DNA damage in both healthy and cancer cells. Research has shown that a medicine like Talzenna, which interferes with (inhibits) the PARP enzyme, makes it harder for cancer cells with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation to fix DNA damage. This makes it even harder for the cancer cells to survive. In other words, a PARP inhibitor makes some cancer cells less likely to survive their DNA damage.

Uses: Talzenna is used to treat locally advanced or metastatic HER2-negative breast cancer with an inherited BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

How it’s given: Talzenna is a pill taken by mouth.

Side effects:

Chemo Brain in Older Women May Be Linked to Specific Version of APOE Gene

https://www.breastcancer.org/research-news/chemo-brain-may-be-linked-to-apoee4-gene

Many women treated for breast cancer say they have problems remembering, thinking, and concentrating during and after treatment. These problems are commonly called “chemo brain” or “chemo fog” — though women treated with hormonal therapy also complain about memory issues. Doctors call these issues “cognitive impairment” or “cognitive problems.”

Some women may have trouble with:

  • learning new tasks
  • remembering names
  • paying attention and concentrating
  • finding the right words
  • multitasking
  • organizing thoughts
  • making decisions
  • remembering where things are (keys, glasses, etc.)

In what is being called the first large study of cognitive issues in older women treated for breast cancer, researchers found that women treated with chemotherapy and/or hormonal therapy had poorer cognitive skills compared to similar women who had not been diagnosed with and treated for breast cancer. Additionally, women with a certain version of the APOE gene —APOEe4 — who were treated with chemotherapy and/or hormonal therapy had the poorest cognitive skills.

The research was published online on Oct. 3, 2018, by the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Read the abstract of “Cancer-Related Cognitive Outcomes Among Older Breast Cancer Survivors in the Thinking and Living With Cancer Study.”

The researchers focused on older women for this study because getting older is associated with cognitive decline. Also, research has shown that chemotherapy treatment produces changes in brain structure that are similar to what happens when a person gets older.

The Thinking and Living With Cancer study was designed to help identify risk factors for cognitive decline in older women because 75% of breast cancer survivors in the United States are age 60 or older.

This…

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More

Afinitor

https://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/targeted_therapies/afinitor

Afinitor (chemical name: everolimus) is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to be used in combination with Aromasin (chemical name: exemestane) to treat advanced-stage, hormone-receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer in postmenopausal women that has already been treated with Femara (chemical name: letrozole) or Arimidex (chemical name: anastrozole).

In this section you can learn more about:

Join the Conversation

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More