Archive for July 2018

Solutions for Libido Loss: Arousal

https://www.breastcancer.org/tips/intimacy/loss_of_libido/arousal

Before attempting intercourse, it’s important to feel comfortable and relaxed, and then aroused. Some therapists suggest that couples learn to concentrate on comfort and foreplay, and delay having intercourse for some later time. In this way, they can establish a successful pattern of foreplay—particularly genital foreplay—as part of their sexual repertoire.

Foreplay is an essential factor for a woman in becoming aroused, particularly for women who find sex painful. The vagina produces natural lubricants, and the vaginal wall relaxes, widens, and lengthens, allowing less painful, more satisfying penetration. A woman is ready for sex after these changes, just as a man is ready when he has an erection.

Viagra may be of some benefit to women who have difficulty becoming sexually aroused. Strictly speaking, Viagra is not an aphrodisiac, but it may help with the female equivalent of a man’s erection, sending blood to the clitoris, vulva, and vagina. This in turn may make sex more comfortable and more enjoyable. (If you are already having orgasms, it is unlikely to make them more intense.) Within a few years we should have the results of several studies looking at Viagra’s value for women.

Researchers also are studying whether a testosterone patch known as Intrinsa can increase women’s sexual desire. Preliminary research has shown some success, but more research is needed to make sure that the higher testosterone levels produced by the patch are not linked to a higher risk of breast cancer.

If low libido is a problem for you, talk to your doctor. Together you can decide if medication is right for you.

If you aren’t feeling particularly attractive or sexy, your ability to become aroused may be inhibited, or you may want to get sex over with as soon as possible. One way to overcome this problem is to imagine yourself as you would like to be, perhaps as some glamorous movie star or romance-novel heroine. Mental turn-ons can be as useful a…

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Mastectomy and Breast Reconstruction Video Series

https://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/surgery/reconstruction/videos

If you’ve been diagnosed with breast cancer, there are a number of surgical options for removing the cancer and getting a result that works for you.

Many women choose the option of mastectomy with breast reconstruction. Some women are able to keep their nipples with nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM). For women who aren’t candidates for NSM, breast reconstruction surgery followed by nipple reconstruction and/or tattooing is an option.

In this video series, you can watch surgeons from the Center for Restorative Breast Surgery in New Orleans explain nipple-sparing mastectomy and nipple reconstruction, and tattoo artist Vinnie Myers talks about the 3D nipple tattooing technique. You’ll also meet three women — Mimi, Deidra, and Peggy — who share their stories about diagnosis, mastectomy, and breast reconstruction.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3GZxCRTcVI&w=100&h=295]

Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy
Karl Ordoyne, M.D., F.A.C.S., Frank DellaCroce, M.D., F.A.C.S., and Scott Sullivan, M.D., F.A.C.S. of the Center for Restorative Breast Surgery explain mastectomy that allows a woman to keep her nipples and how surgeons decide who is a candidate. You’ll also meet Mimi, who talks about how nipple-sparing mastectomy helped restore her body’s original appearance after surgery.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kM1rB1VvCxU&w=100&h=295]

Nipple Reconstruction and 3D Nipple Tattooing
Frank DellaCroce, M.D., F.A.C.S. and Scott Sullivan, M.D., F.A.C.S. of the Center for Restorative Breast Surgery and 3D nipple tattoo artist Vinnie Myers explain the procedures that complete the mastectomy and breast reconstruction process: nipple reconstruction and 3D tattooing. Peggy tells the story of how both procedures transformed negative feelings about a past reconstruction into an improved body image.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBLKU60TA-Y&w=100&h=295]

Mastectomy an…

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Breast Cancer Risk Factors

https://www.breastcancer.org/risk/factors

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Every woman wants to know what she can do to lower her risk of breast cancer. Some of the factors associated with breast cancer — being a woman, your age, and your genetics, for example — can’t be changed. Other factors — being overweight, lack of exercise, smoking cigarettes, and eating unhealthy food — can be changed by making choices. By choosing the healthiest lifestyle options possible, you can empower yourself and make sure your breast cancer risk is as low as possible.

The known risk factors for breast cancer are listed below. Click on each link to learn more about the risk factor and ways you can minimize it in your own life. If a factor can’t be changed (such as your genetics), you can learn about protective steps you can take that can help keep your risk as low as possible.

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Established risks:

Being a Woman

Just being a woman is the biggest risk factor for developing breast cancer. There are about 266,120 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 63,960 cases of non-invasive breast cancer this year in American women.

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<a title="Breast Cancer Risk Factors: Age" href="https://www.breastcancer.org/risk/fact…

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TAILORx Finds Some Women With Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer Can Skip Chemotherapy

http://www.lbbc.org/news-opinion/tailorx-finds-some-women-hormone-receptor-positive-breast-cancer-can-skip-chemotherapy

The trial shows surgery and hormonal therapy is enough for many women with mid-range Oncotype DX scores
Breast Cancer News
July 30, 2018
Author: 
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Being a Woman

https://www.breastcancer.org/risk/factors/woman

Just being a woman is the biggest risk factor for developing breast cancer. There are about 266,120 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 63,960 cases of non-invasive breast cancer this year in American women. While men do develop breast cancer, less than 1% of all new breast cancer cases happen in men. Approximately 2,550 cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed in American men this year.

The biggest reasons for the difference in breast cancer rates between men and women are:

  • Women’s breast development takes 3 to 4 years and is usually complete by age 14. It’s uncommon for men’s breasts to fully form — most of the male breasts you see are fat, not formed glands.
  • Once fully formed, breast cells are very immature and highly active until a woman’s first full-term pregnancy. While they are immature, a women’s breast cells are very responsive to estrogen and other hormones, including hormone disrupters in the environment.
  • Men’s breast cells are inactive and most men have extremely low levels of estrogen.

So hormonal stimulation of highly responsive and vulnerable breast cells in women, particularly during the extra-sensitive period of breast development, is why breast cancer is much more common in women than in men.

Steps you can take

Changing your sex to reduce your risk of breast cancer is not a realistic or reasonable possibility. But there are lifestyle choices you can make to reduce your estrogen exposure and reduce this sex-related risk:

Breast Cancer And Insomnia: Why It Happens And 10 Things You Can Do To Improve Sleep

http://blog.thebreastcancersite.com/cancer-and-insomnia/

Breast cancer patients are tired. They’re exhausted and they could use a good night’s rest, but isn’t it always the case that the one thing you need is the one thing that’s hardest to get? Nearly 70 percent of women with breast cancer have trouble sleeping, and more than 60 percent of women with cancer…… Read More

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