Archive for March 2018

Other Ways to Give

http://www.breastcancer.org/community/support/other-ways-to-give

Below are just a few ways you can support the mission of Breastcancer.org. If you would like more details, feel free to contact Breastcancer.org at 610.642.6550 or at support@breastcancer.org.

Matching Gifts

Your company may have a matching gift program that could double or even triple your donation. Enter your employer’s name in the “Find Your Employer” box on the donation form to find your matching gift program. Check with your HR department or office manager for forms and/or additional information.

Monthly Giving

A small gift each month helps Breastcancer.org spend more money helping women get the answers they need and less on administrative costs. It is an easy and affordable way for individuals to make their support go further and make a sustaining impact on the women we serve. Use our donation form to automatically make your gift each month.

Stock Gifts

To transfer securities from your brokerage account to the Breastcancer.org account, you will need to contact your brokerage firm with the following information:

Please transfer shares to Wells Fargo Advisors via DTC:

DTC # 0141

Further Credit to FCC account number 13300681

Please notify Michael Gibson directly at our brokerage firm when you have completed this transaction so he can notify us immediately:

Michael Gibson, CFP®

Assistant Vice President – Investments

Wells Fargo Advisors – Wealth Brokerage Services

402 West Lancaster Avenue
Haverford, PA 19041
Tel 610.645.1665
Fax 215.670.4133
Toll Free 888.243.1424

michae…

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Join the Circle

http://www.breastcancer.org/community/support/circle

Breastcancer.org’s dedication to fostering relationships built on honesty and respect is visually represented in our logo. The pink ribbon circle signifies the trust inherent in the information and the support we provide all who come to us.

Similarly, we celebrate the trust of our most generous donors by recognizing them as members of The Circle. These distinguished supporters make gifts and pledge payments of $1,000 or more within our fiscal year (June 1 to May 31). Through their leadership, members of The Circle demonstrate the impact of meaningful philanthropy and serve as an inspiration to us all.

Please continue your support to ensure that the millions of women we serve get the help they need to understand their complex medical needs in order to get the best care possible.

If you would like more details, feel free to contact Breastcancer.org at 610.642.6550 or at support@breastcancer.org.

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Study Suggests Earlier Research on CYP2D6 Is Flawed

http://www.breastcancer.org/research-news/earlier-research-on-cyp2d6-may-be-flawed

Tamoxifen is a hormonal therapy medicine that is used in several different ways to treat different types of breast cancer:

  • It’s used to lower the risk of breast cancer coming back (recurrence) in men and women diagnosed with early-stage, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer after surgery. Doctors call tamoxifen used in this way adjuvant hormonal therapy.
  • Tamoxifen also is used to treat women and men diagnosed with advanced-stage or metastatic hormone-receptor-positive disease.
  • Finally, tamoxifen is used to reduce breast cancer risk in women who haven’t been diagnosed but are at higher-than-average risk.

The body uses an enzyme called CYP2D6 to convert tamoxifen into its active form. The CYP2D6 enzyme is made by the CYP2D6 gene. About 10% of people have a CYP2D6 genotype (a classification of the CYP2D6 gene) that doesn’t function as it should and so doesn’t make enough of the CYP2D6 enzyme. Some smaller studies found that people with certain CYP2D6 genotypes might not get all the benefits of tamoxifen. After these smaller studies were published, some doctors and women began to ask for CYP2D6 genetic testing.

But CYP2D6 testing is controversial because several large studies then found no link between CYP2D6 genotypes and the effectiveness of tamoxifen.

A new study by researchers at the Mayo Clinic suggests that the large studies on CYP2D6 may be flawed because the studies did the genetic testing on samples of tissue from the breast cancer rather than on healthy tissue.

The study is published in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 107, issue 2. Read the abstract of “Loss of Heterozygosity at the CYP2D6 Locus in Breast Cancer: Implications for Germline Pharmacogenetic St…

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Study Suggests Lack of Vitamin D Production During Winter Months May Make Tamoxifen Less Effective

http://www.breastcancer.org/research-news/20130520

Tamoxifen, a type of hormonal therapy medicine is used to:

  • reduce breast cancer risk in women who haven’t been diagnosed but are at higher-than-average risk for disease
  • lower the risk of breast cancer coming back (recurrence) in women diagnosed with early-stage, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer
  • treat advanced-stage hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer

Tamoxifen works very well for most people, but there are some who have a recurrence or have a cancer grow while taking tamoxifen. Doctors have been trying to figure out why this happens.

The body uses an enzyme called CYP2D6 to convert tamoxifen into its active form. About 10% of people have an abnormal version of the CYP2D6 enzyme, which may keep them from getting the full benefit of tamoxifen. You may want to ask your doctor about being tested for this enzyme abnormality if you’re considering taking tamoxifen.

Still, CYP2D6 testing is controversial because several large studies found that an abnormal CYP2D6 enzyme didn’t affect tamoxifen’s effectiveness. Also, certain medications can block the activity of the CYP2D6 enzyme, including antidepressants known as SSRIs and SNRIs, as well as Benadryl (chemical name: diphenhydramine) and Tagamet (chemical name: cimetidine).

Now, a study by Canadian researchers suggests that lower vitamin D levels during winter months also may affect tamoxifen’s effectiveness.

Vitamin D3 helps the CYP2D6 enzyme work. Most vitamin D is made when an inactive form of the nutrient is activated in your skin when it’s exposed to sunlight.

The study was published in the May 2013 issue of Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. Read the abstract of “CYP3A4 and seasonal variation in vitamin D status in addition to CYP2D6 contribute to therapeutic endoxifen level during tamoxifen therapy.”

The researche…

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New Guidelines Prefer Aromatase Inhibitors Over Tamoxifen

http://www.breastcancer.org/research-news/20100715b

Many postmenopausal women take hormonal therapy medicine — either an aromatase inhibitor or tamoxifen — after breast cancer surgery and other treatments for hormone-receptor-positive, early-stage breast cancer. Hormonal therapy can reduce the risk of the cancer coming back (recurrence). Hormonal therapy used in this way is called adjuvant hormonal therapy.

The aromatase inhibitors are:

  • Arimidex (chemical name: anastrozole)
  • Aromasin (chemical name: exemestane)
  • Femara (chemical name: letrozole)

Most women take adjuvant hormonal therapy for 5 years.

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has issued new guidelines on adjuvant hormonal therapy medicines. ASCO is a national organization of oncologists and other cancer care providers.

The new ASCO recommendations for adjuvant hormonal therapy treatment for postmenopausal women diagnosed with early-stage, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer are:

An aromatase inhibitor is preferred over tamoxifen. This recommendation is supported by a number of studies showing that women treated with an aromatase inhibitor are somewhat less likely than those treated with tamoxifen to have the cancer come back.

Most women should take adjuvant hormonal therapy for a total of 5

years. Options include:

  • taking the same hormonal therapy for all 5 years (monotherapy)
  • taking tamoxifen for 2 or 3 years and then switching to an aromatase inhibitor until hormonal therapy has been taken for a total of 5 years (sequential therapy)
  • taking tamoxifen for 5 years if a woman started taking an aromatase inhibitor but had to stop taking the aromatase inhibitor before completing 5 full years of treatment (perhaps because of intolerable side effects)

While not routine, some women may benefit from taking adjuvant hormonal therapy for 8 to 10 years (called extended adjuv…

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Contact Us

http://www.breastcancer.org/contact_us

Thank you for your interest in Breastcancer.org.

Breastcancer.org
120 East Lancaster Avenue
Suite 201
Ardmore, PA 19003
T: 610.642.6550

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