Archive for February 2018

Lumpectomy: What to Expect

http://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/surgery/lumpectomy/expectations

Before lumpectomy surgery

In the hospital on the day of surgery, you’ll change into a hospital gown and wait in a preoperative holding area.

If the tumor cannot be seen or felt, the surgeon will use a procedure before surgery to locate and mark the tumor using mammogram or ultrasound.

Your surgeon or a nurse may draw markings on your breast that show where the incision will be made. Usually this is done with a felt-tip marker.

You will be taken into the anesthesia room, where a nurse will insert an intravenous infusion (IV) line into your hand or arm and tape it into place. Soon after this, you’ll be given relaxing medication through the IV line. Most people who have lumpectomy choose to have a local anesthetic to numb the surgery area, but some have general anesthesia.

What happens during lumpectomy surgery

The lumpectomy surgery itself should take about 15-40 minutes.

Your surgeon will probably operate with a kind of electric scalpel that uses heat to minimize bleeding (an electrocautery knife). Most surgeons use curved incisions (like a smile or a frown) that follow the natural curve of your breast and allow for better healing. If the tumor can be seen or felt, the surgeon will remove it along with a rim of healthy tissue around it.

Sometimes, but not always, a rubber tube called a drain will be surgically inserted into your breast area or armpit to collect excess fluid that can accumulate in the space where the tumor was. The drain is connected to a plastic bulb that creates suction to help remove fluid. Finally, your surgeon will stitch the incision closed and dress the wound.

After lumpectomy

You’ll be moved to the recovery room after lumpectomy surgery, where staff will monitor your heart rate, body temperature, and blood pressure. Staying overnight in the hospital is not usually necessary with lumpectomy, unless you’re also having <a title="Lymph Node Removal" href="http://www.breast…

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Eating When You Have Nausea and Vomiting

http://www.breastcancer.org/tips/nutrition/during_treat/side_effects/nausea

Almost all breast cancer treatments have varying degrees of risk for nausea and vomiting. Some people never have nausea or vomiting, while others experience it frequently. Many people describe having “stomach awareness,” a type of discomfort in which a person is not interested in eating, but does not feel nauseated. Some people have nausea that lingers more than a week beyond chemotherapy. Thankfully, these side effects can almost always be controlled, or at least substantially reduced, by a variety of medications and lifestyle changes. Learn more about the causes and ways to relieve nausea and vomiting.

Don’t force yourself to drink or eat if you’re nauseated or vomiting. It’s a good idea to avoid eating for about 4 to 8 hours if you’re vomiting often. Along the way, try small sips of water or flat ginger ale. After your stomach settles down a bit, begin to replace some of the chemicals and fluids that you might have lost because of the vomiting. Try sipping chicken or vegetable broth, a sports drink, or small bites of gelatin. These will help keep you hydrated. Don’t rely only on clear liquids for more than 2 days in a row — they don’t have enough nutrients.

If you’re nauseated from treatment, you may find that the odor of food triggers your symptoms. You might want to ask a friend, spouse, or partner to cook for you while you leave the house so you don’t have to smell the food cooking. Staying out of the kitchen can help since it’s so closely associated with foods and smells. Order take-out if possible. You also might find that your food likes and dislikes change from day to day. Try new things until you find something you can tolerate. It’s also good to try to drink 8 or more cups of liquid each day if you can. See if you can drink another half cup for each time you…

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