Archive for August 2017

Review Offers Recommendations for Managing Menopausal Symptoms in Women Who’ve Been Diagnosed With Breast Cancer

http://www.breastcancer.org/research-news/managing-menopausal-symptoms-and-bc

Most women go through menopause as a natural part of the aging process, at about age 51 on average — some sooner, some later. But if you’ve been diagnosed with breast cancer before menopause, some treatments could bring on menopause earlier and more abruptly than expected.

Hormonal therapy medicines, such as tamoxifen and the aromatase inhibitors, also can cause or make menopausal symptoms worse. Hormonal therapy medicines are taken after surgery by women diagnosed with hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer to reduce the risk of the cancer coming back (recurrence).

Menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, vaginal dryness, and night sweats can dramatically reduce quality of life for many women. Some women use hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to ease these symptoms. But research has shown that HRT increases breast cancer risk in women who haven’t been diagnosed. HRT also increases the risk of recurrence in women who have been diagnosed with the disease. Women who’ve been diagnosed with breast cancer SHOULD NOT take HRT.

Researchers have reviewed published studies on ways women who’ve been diagnosed with breast cancer can safely manage menopausal symptoms and made recommendations, including quitting smoking and exercising regularly.

The study was published online on Aug. 2, 2017 by the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Read the abstract of “Managing menopausal symptoms and associated clinical issues in breast cancer survivors.”

To develop the recommendations, the researchers reviewed clinical trials, observational studies, guidelines based on scientific evidence, and expert opinions from professional organizations.

To manage menopausal symptoms in women who’ve been diagnosed with…

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More

MammaPrint Test

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/testing/types/mammaprint

The MammaPrint test, made by Agendia, is a genomic test that analyzes the activity of certain genes in early-stage breast cancer.

Research suggests the MammaPrint test may eventually be widely used to help make treatment decisions based on the cancer’s risk of coming back (recurrence) within 10 years after diagnosis.

Knowing if a woman has a high or low risk of early-stage breast cancer coming back might help women and their doctors decide if chemotherapy or other treatments to reduce risk after surgery are needed.

What are genomic tests?

Genomic tests analyze a sample of a cancer tumor to see how active certain genes are. The activity level of these genes affects the behavior of the cancer, including how likely it is to grow and spread. Genomic tests are used to help make decisions about whether more treatments after surgery would be beneficial.

While their names sound similar, genomic testing and genetic testing are very different.

Genetic testing is done on a sample of your blood, saliva, or other tissue and can tell if you have an abnormal change (also called a mutation) in a gene that is linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. See the Genetic Testing pages for more information.

Who’s eligible for the MammaPrint test?

MammaPrint can only be used to analyze early-stage breast cancers. In the United States, MammaPrint can be used on cancers that are:

  • stage I or stage II
  • invasive
  • smaller than 5 centimeters
  • estrogen-receptor-positive or -negative 

Internationally, MammaPrint can be used on cancers that are:

  • stage I or stage II
  • invasive
  • smaller than 5 centimeters
  • in three or fewer lymph nodes

In both the United States and internationally, MammaPrint can be used to analyze cancers that are hormone-receptor-positi…

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More

Breast Cancer Index Test

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/testing/types/breast-cancer-index-test

The Breast Cancer Index test, made by bioTheranostics, analyzes the activity of seven genes to help predict the risk of node-negative, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer coming back 5 to 10 years after diagnosis. The test can help women and their doctors decide if extending hormonal therapy 5 more years (for a total of 10 years of hormonal therapy) would be beneficial.

The Breast Cancer Index reports two scores: how likely the cancer is to recur 5 to 10 years after diagnosis and how likely a woman is to benefit from taking hormonal therapy for a total of 10 years.

Research suggests the Breast Cancer Index test may eventually be widely used to help make treatment decisions based on the cancer’s risk of coming back in a part of the body away from the breast (distant metastasis) within 10 years after diagnosis.

Right now, the Breast Cancer Index test is not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

What are genomic tests?

Genomic tests analyze a sample of a cancer tumor to see how active certain genes are. The activity level of these genes affects the behavior of the cancer, including how likely it is to grow and spread. Genomic tests are used to help make decisions about whether more treatments after surgery would be beneficial.

While their names sound similar, genomic testing and genetic testing are very different.

Genetic testing is done on a sample of your blood, saliva, or other tissue and can tell if you have an abnormal change (also called a mutation) in a gene that is linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. See the Genetic Testing pages for more information.

Who’s eligible for the Breast Cancer Index test?

You may be eligible for the Breast Cancer Index test if:

  • you were diagnosed with early-stage (stage I-III) breast cancer
  • the cancer was hormone-receptor-positive and HER2-ne…

    Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

    Read More

EndoPredict Test

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/testing/types/endopredict-test

The EndoPredict Test, made by Sividon Diagnostics and distributed by Myriad, is a genomic test that analyzes the activity of a group of genes that can affect how a cancer is likely to behave and respond to treatment.

Research suggests the EndoPredict test may eventually be widely used to help make treatment decisions based on the cancer’s risk of coming back in a part of the body away from the breast (distant metastasis) within 10 years after diagnosis.

Knowing if a woman has a high or low risk of early-stage breast cancer coming back might help women and their doctors decide if chemotherapy or other treatments to reduce risk after surgery are needed.

Right now, the EndoPredict test is approved to be used in Europe but not the United States. Sividon, the company that makes the EndoPredict test, has said that it plans to seek U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for the test.

What are genomic tests?

Genomic tests analyze a sample of a cancer tumor to see how active certain genes are. The activity level of these genes affects the behavior of the cancer, including how likely it is to grow and spread. Genomic tests are used to help make decisions about whether more treatments after surgery would be beneficial.

While their names sound similar, genomic testing and genetic testing are very different.

Genetic testing is done on a sample of your blood, saliva, or other tissue and can tell if you have an abnormal change (also called a mutation) in a gene that is linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. See the Genetic Testing pages for more information.

Who’s eligible for the EndoPredict test?

You may be eligible for the EndoPredict test if:

  • you’ve recently been diagnosed with early-stage, hormone-receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer
  • there is no cancer in your lymph nodes (node-nega…

    Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

    Read More

Breastcancer.org Facts & Figures

http://www.breastcancer.org/about_us/press_room/press_kit/bco_facts

  • Breastcancer.org is the world’s leading online resource for breast health and breast cancer information.
  • The site was founded in 2000 by renowned breast oncologist Marisa C. Weiss, M.D. to help those affected by breast cancer make sense of complex medical information and empower them to make the best decisions throughout their medical and emotional journey.
  • In the 17 years since it started, Breastcancer.org has helped 91 million people from over 246 different countries and territories around the world.
  • Breastcancer.org gets almost 85,000 visits a day, over 2.5 million visits each month, and received more than 31 million visits in 2016.
  • The site includes approximately 6,000 pages of original, expert-reviewed content providing the most reliable, complete, and up-to-date breast health and breast cancer information available.
  • Breastcancer.org’s content is produced in consultation with a Professional Advisory Board made up of over 80 experts touching all aspects of breast cancer including medical, surgical and radiation oncologists, oncology nurses, plastic surgeons, social workers, nutritionists, and insurance experts.
  • Breastcancer.org hosts a vibrant and caring peer support community where people can connect with others to share experiences and advice. There are more than 165,000 registered users of the Breastcancer.org discussion boards, over 80 forums, and more than 130,000 topics.

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More