Archive for March 2017

Women Who Have Immediate Autologous Reconstruction Report Being More Satisfied With Breasts, but Have More Pain 1 Year After Surgery

http://www.breastcancer.org/research-news/immediate-autologous-recon-more-satisfying

Many, but not all, women who have mastectomy to treat breast cancer go on to have one or both breasts reconstructed. There are many ways to reconstruct a breast. Tissue from the back, belly, buttocks, or other part of the body can be used to create a new breast. Doctors call this autologous reconstruction. Saline or silicone gel implants are another option. In some cases, an implant is added after autologous reconstruction.

Breast reconstruction can be done at different times, depending on what works best for a woman’s individual situation. When breast reconstruction is done at the same time as mastectomy surgery, it’s called immediate reconstruction. As soon as the breast is removed by the breast cancer surgeons, the plastic surgeon reconstructs the breast.

When breast reconstruction is done after breast cancer surgery or after any other treatments, such as radiation or chemotherapy, it’s called delayed reconstruction. There is also a staged approach, which is called delayed-immediate reconstruction. In this approach a tissue expander or implant is placed under the chest muscle and preserved breast skin immediately after the breast is removed. Once radiation is completed and the tissues have recovered (about 4 to 6 months), the expander or implant is removed and replaced with either your own tissue or a long-term implant.

The goal of immediate breast reconstruction is to optimize a woman’s quality of life and maintain her body image. She wakes up from surgery with a new breast (or breasts) and doesn’t have to wear a prosthesis or have a tissue expander in place for several weeks or months.

Doctors wanted to know how women perceived the outcomes of immediate breast reconstruction.

A study suggests that 1 year after surgery, women who had immediate autologous reconstruction were more satisfied with their breasts and had better sexual and psychosocial well-being than women who had immediate…

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5 things you need to know about Breast Cancer Screening Right Now!

https://rethinkbreastcancer.com/5-things-you-need-to-know-about-breast-cancer-screening-right-now/

Screening 101

Did you know in November 2011, the Canadian Task Force on Preventative Health Care (yes, it’s a mouth full) CTFPHC released their updated guidelines on breast cancer screening, including the use of mammography, magnetic resonance imaging, breast self-exam and clinical breast exam to screen for breast cancer?  The recommendations apply only to women at average risk of breast cancer aged 40 to 74 years. They do not apply to women at higher risk due to personal history of breast cancer, history of breast cancer in first degree relative, known BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation, or prior chest wall radiation.

Clinician Breast Exam is SO 2011

For women 40 to 74, the task force recommends not routinely performing Clinical Breast Exam alone or in conjunction with mammography to screen for breast cancer. The task force also recommends not advising women to routinely practice Breast Self-Exam. That’s right, you heard us. This is because no evidence was found indicating that Clinical Breast Exam or Breast Self-Exam reduced breast cancer mortality or all-cause mortality.

Back in 2011, two large trials conducted by CTFPHC identified no reduction in breast cancer mortality associated with teaching Breast Self-Exam to women aged 31 to 64, but found evidence of increased harm for benign breast biopsy. We want you to be breast aware! We advocate women get familiar with their breasts and know what feels right so they’ll know if anything feels wrong and discuss it with their doctor.

A picture or no picture says 1000 words

For women aged 40–49, the task force recommends not routinely screening with mammography. A review of t…

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

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5 things you need to know about Breast Cancer Screening Right Now!

https://rethinkbreastcancer.com/5-things-you-need-to-know-about-breast-cancer-screening-right-now/

Screening 101

Did you know in November 2011, the Canadian Task Force on Preventative Health Care (yes, it’s a mouth full) CTFPHC released their updated guidelines on breast cancer screening, including the use of mammography, magnetic resonance imaging, breast self-exam and clinical breast exam to screen for breast cancer?  The recommendations apply only to women at average risk of breast cancer aged 40 to 74 years. They do not apply to women at higher risk due to personal history of breast cancer, history of breast cancer in first degree relative, known BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation, or prior chest wall radiation.

Clinician Breast Exam is SO 2011

For women 40 to 74, the task force recommends not routinely performing Clinical Breast Exam alone or in conjunction with mammography to screen for breast cancer. The task force also recommends not advising women to routinely practice Breast Self-Exam. That’s right, you heard us. This is because no evidence was found indicating that Clinical Breast Exam or Breast Self-Exam reduced breast cancer mortality or all-cause mortality.

Back in 2011, two large trials conducted by CTFPHC identified no reduction in breast cancer mortality associated with teaching Breast Self-Exam to women aged 31 to 64, but found evidence of increased harm for benign breast biopsy. We want you to be breast aware! We advocate women get familiar with their breasts and know what feels right so they’ll know if anything feels wrong and discuss it with their doctor.

A picture or no picture says 1000 words

For women aged 40–49, the task force recommends not routinely screening with mammography. A review of the evidence shows that there is no mortality benefit to screening for women of average risk in this age category.  According to the results of a study published in 2015 by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, screening mammography in women under age 40 results in high rates of callbacks, low rates of cancer detection, a… Read More

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Life After Treatment | Breast Cancer

https://moniquerose8.com/2017/03/31/life-after-treatment-breast-cancer/

I cannot believe that I have not published a blog post in over seven months! That is just proof that my life is crazy and time is going by so fast!


In those seven months, I’ve done a lot! 

Finished Herceptin infusions
Got my port removed
Went to San Francisco and attended the Young Survival Coalition Summit which was amazing!
Planning a trip to Portugal this summer
Started physical therapy


I thought I would give a quick update on what life has been like after treatment. Most people think that since you are “done,” your life just goes back to normal. That couldn’t be far from the truth. It is so hard to get back into my routine and not worry about cancer. I worry daily that it will come back and I’ll have to fight again. It’s so crazy how much my mind is consumed of cancer. A cough, runny nose, muscle knot or headache makes me instantly think cancer. How bad is that?! 

I’ve never had anxiety in my life and I’ve had a lot of it after treatment. I seem to worry about everything, but I’ve tried to incorporate some mindfulness in my day. I’ve found the following tricks to help:

Practicing Yoga
Eating healthier
Thinking positively 
Staying busy
Finding a new hobby
Planning new trips (since that always puts me in a good mood!)
Talking to a social worker

The emotional battle seems to be very challenging since the mind can play tricks on you. Every ache and pain I think it’s cancer. I need to keep reminding myself that I’m healthy and I cannot worry about everything. It’s much harder than you think! I’m trying my best to live in the moment.

What are some tips that have help… Read More

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Slideshows on Treatment & Side Effects

http://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/slideshows

5 Tips to Ease Breast Cancer Treatment-Related Constipation

11 Tips for Better Nail Care During Chemotherapy

10 Ways to Manage Breast Cancer Treatment-Related Nausea

11 Ways to Manage Breast Cancer Treatment-Related Hot Flashes

11 Tips for Managing Hair Loss

6 Tips to Ease Dry Skin

6 Tips for Finding a Specialist for a Second Opinion

5 Tips to Help Stay Hydrated

11 Ways to Help Manage Appetite Loss

16 Ways to Reduce the Risk of Lymphedema

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Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

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