Archive for February 2017

Is Prophylactic Ovary Removal Right for You?

http://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/surgery/prophylactic_ovary/who_its_for

Many women who are considered high-risk for breast cancer also have a much higher-than-average risk of developing ovarian cancer. To determine whether you’re also at risk for ovarian cancer, talk to your doctor about seeing a genetic counselor (a health professional specially trained to provide information and advice about inherited conditions). If after meeting with a counselor you are found to be at high risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer, you may want to explore different strategies for reducing your risk.

Although prophylactic ovary removal can significantly reduce the risk of developing ovarian cancer — and also reduce the risk of breast cancer when done before menopause — this surgery is a serious choice that can have a considerable impact on your life. The sudden loss of estrogen can cause a range of side effects, such as hot flashes, depression, difficulty sleeping, and lessened sex drive. Estrogen loss may affect bone and heart health. Ovary removal also takes away your ability to have children.

Regardless of whether prophylactic ovary removal is involved, there are many factors to consider when deciding on a risk-reduction strategy. Take the time you need to talk to your doctor and family members about the different ways you can lower your risk.

You may wish to consider prophylactic ovary removal if there is evidence that breast and/or ovarian cancer run in your family. You and your doctor may decide prophylactic ovary removal is an option for you if:

  • You’ve tested positive for the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations, which can increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer. If you test positive for either of these mutations, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend removal of ovaries and fallopian tubes between age 35 and 40 and as soon as you are…

    Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

    Read More

The 411: Sex + Cancer Dating 101

https://rethinkbreastcancer.com/the-411-sex-cancer-dating-101/

The physical and emotional changes associated with breast cancer often alter the ways in which women relate to their bodies, including their sense of being a woman or a sexual being.  Not surprisingly, these changes can also have an impact on how women approach dating and how they interact with prospective partners.  Getting back into the dating scene can be intimidating for any single woman, but for women who’ve had breast cancer, it can feel even more daunting.  When you’ve gone through breast cancer, you might be faced with questions and concerns about dating that you didn’t have to think about before.  Women dealing with breast cancer might find themselves wondering how they measure up to other women in the same dating pool.  They might question whether or not they are ready to date.  There might also be some anxiety about talking to prospective partners about breast cancer, and how they might react.   Women might also feel nervous and unsure about becoming physical with a new partner.

When it comes to breast cancer and dating, here are some common questions that women have, and some helpful tips for getting back into the game.

When is a good time to start dating after breast cancer, and how will I know I’m ready?

It takes a lot of courage to make the decision to start dating again, and there really is no rulebook when it comes to dating readiness.  Knowing when you are ready to date is a personal decision.  Some women actively date while still in treatment, others start dating as soon as they are done treatment, while others prefer to take some time to focus on themselves before they even consider the idea of dating.

When it comes to dating readiness, it all comes down to respecting your own vulnerabilities and comfort levels.  By the same token, be mindful of the fact that you might never feel 100% ready.

Let this last point sink in…do we really need to be 100% certain and free of all doubt in order t… Read More

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More

The 411: Sex + Cancer Dating 101

https://rethinkbreastcancer.com/the-411-sex-cancer-dating-101/

The physical and emotional changes associated with breast cancer often alter the ways in which women relate to their bodies, including their sense of being a woman or a sexual being.  Not surprisingly, these changes can also have an impact on how women approach dating and how they interact with prospective partners.  Getting back into the dating scene can be intimidating for any single woman, but for women who’ve had breast cancer, it can feel even more daunting.  When you’ve gone through breast cancer, you might be faced with questions and concerns about dating that you didn’t have to think about before.  Women dealing with breast cancer might find themselves wondering how they measure up to other women in the same dating pool.  They might question whether or not they are ready to date.  There might also be some anxiety about talking to prospective partners about breast cancer, and how they might react.   Women might also feel nervous and unsure about becoming physical with a new partner.

When it comes to breast cancer and dating, here are some common questions that women have, and some helpful tips for getting back into the game.

When is a good time to start dating after breast cancer, and how will I know I’m ready?

It takes a lot of courage to make the decision to start dating again, and there really is no rulebook when it comes to dating readiness.  Knowing when you are ready to date is a personal decision.  Some women actively date while still in treatment, others start dating as soon as they are done treatment, while others prefer to take some time to focus on themselves before they even consider the idea of dating.

When it comes to dating readiness, it all comes down to respecting your own vulnerabilities and comfort levels.  By the same token, be mindful of the fact that you might never feel 100% ready.

<…

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More

More Young Women Using BRCA Test Results to Choose Treatment

http://www.lbbc.org/news-opinion/more-young-women-using-brca-test-results-choose-treatment

Breast Cancer News
February 8, 2017
Author: 
Robin Warshaw, Contributing Writer
Reviewer(s): 

<div class="field__items field-reviewers__items node-news-article__field-reviewers-items node-news-article__fie…

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More

A Letter to the Girl Faced with a Mastectomy

https://shesparkleson.com/2017/02/26/a-letter-to-the-girl-faced-with-a-mastectomy/

To Whom This May Concern,

Hey!  My name is Meghan and this time last year… I was preparing for my tits to get chopped off!  Okay, I guess that wasn’t the BEST introduction, but it is 100% true! April of 2016, I underwent a double mastectomy after 12 rounds of chemo and pending 30 radiation treatments following my diagnosis of stage 2B breast cancer.  I have been through it all my friend, and since i’ve already been there and done that, here are some tips,advice, and what to expect in the next few months to come…

The Mastectomy.  

IMG_6930

Okay, plain and simple… its freaking scary.  It sucks going into any cancer journey, but when the treatments begin to take away every last bit of the “old you”, it hurts.  Emotionally, then physically. My first bit of advice is to celebrate! I am all about throwing a party, and what a greater celebration than becoming cancer free? Legit the cancer filled tissue/ tumor is about to leave your body… and your beloved boobies are simply a sacrifice for your life!  Even if it’s as simple as buying yourself a cupcake, lighting a candle and making a wish. This event shouldn’t be a funereal or even somber in nature, but instead a bright, sparkly, vibrant, celebration of life and BOOBS!

IMG_6945
IMG_7099
<img width="150" height="150" src="https://shesparklessheshines.files.wordpress.com/2016/04/img_7100.jpg?w=150&h=150" class… Read More

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More

Cancer is Crap: sicksicksicksicksicksicksick

https://rethinkbreastcancer.com/cancer-is-crap-sicksicksicksicksicksicksick/

September 30th 2009, 10:47am

I’m knocked out with a nasty cold right now, courtesy of my daughter and husband (jerks.) And my medical oncologist still hasn’t called me back yet (jerk) about whether or not I can take vitamin C and echinacea with these new drugs. And my laptop keeps freezing (total jerk) and overall I’m just in a foul mood.  In the comic strip of my life there’s a little black cloud of crankiness speckled with cold-germs surrounding me as I shuffle around with my teacup and bad hair.  I am really unpleasant right now.  Like, ready to kill someone because I don’t have slippers — as if that could possibly be someone else’s fault.  How is it that I can handle cancer (biggest jerk of them all) with a sense of humour, but a cold makes me demonic? I think my best option is to get back in bed and scowl at the world from under my duvet until I feel well enough to be nice again.  Or at least well enough to stop with the name-calling.

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More

Cancer is Crap: sicksicksicksicksicksicksick

https://rethinkbreastcancer.com/cancer-is-crap-sicksicksicksicksicksicksick/

September 30th 2009, 10:47am

I’m knocked out with a nasty cold right now, courtesy of my daughter and husband (jerks.) And my medical oncologist still hasn’t called me back yet (jerk) about whether or not I can take vitamin C and echinacea with these new drugs. And my laptop keeps freezing (total jerk) and overall I’m just in a foul mood.  In the comic strip of my life there’s a little black cloud of crankiness speckled with cold-germs surrounding me as I shuffle around with my teacup and bad hair.  I am really unpleasant right now.  Like, ready to kill someone because I don’t have slippers — as if that could possibly be someone else’s fault.  How is it that I can handle cancer (biggest jerk of them all) with a sense of humour, but a cold makes me demonic? I think my best option is to get back in bed and scowl at the world from under my duvet until I feel well enough to be nice again.  Or at least well enough to stop with the name-calling.

Read More

Full credit to the source URL for this article; please feel free to follow the link through to the full article.

Read More